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  • #13
    Hi Ben and to answer you question I'm not sure if will make the crusher but i have other irons in the fire as well which need other people to make for me but i will never say never I could be old and decreped and decide then to make something

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    • #14
      well I got the rock tumbler and have given it a trial.
      I think my milling balls are too light to start them off, what little pieces did come off were milled down to very fine powder but i'm not sure whether that was just an odd ceramic piece.

      so i've ordered bigger balls, hope they're heavy enough to start the process but I will be hitting the ic's with a hammer to try start them off better.
      see how i go.
      Buying eWaste link here

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      • #15
        Looks like it doesn't work well, there's been some suggestions I might try though.
        filling with more ic's, adding water and some more big balls.
        also looking at a way to crush them to start them off, not sure what to use though.
         
        Buying eWaste link here

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        • Bren gun21
          Bren gun21 commented
          Editing a comment
          Have you still got the plans for the mill I'm sure you can find someone to make one for you and also may make it even better with a hopper etc

          The thing with the tumbler is that you do need to have water but also you need to run it for a week at least which isn't great when you want something done yesterday

          Good to see how it works though you may even try what Geo had done with a cement mixer

          take the legs of before tumbling them could help as well

          have a good one c ya

      • #16
        Ben, on this topic, Successful Engineer just uploaded some YouTube vids on gold recover of IC's without incineration. Pretty good 3 part video. He goes through the failures and the successful one.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lrYP1SbJQYg

        Thats the link, very informative, going to try make one and then work out how to sound proof it a bit.

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        • #17
          Yeah interesting, i'd never be able to make it, i'm not that clever
           
          Buying eWaste link here

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          • #18
             
            Buying eWaste link here

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            • #19
              Geo made this setup for filtering the powder, thought it was interesting too
               
              Buying eWaste link here

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              • #20
                Full incineration is not really necessary. The plastic body is the same as any plastic and is primarily carbon and resin. There is a process called pyrolysis where the material is literally baked to remove the oils from the resin. It does require heat but the actually chip body does not combust. The chips comes out very brittle and can be milled effectively in a very minimal fashion such as a mortar and pestle. There are many ways to pyrolize something. An acquaintance of mine in New Zealand is a wizard when it comes to playing with fire. He goes by Deano but apparently that is a very common name in Australia.

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                • #21
                  Baking it sounds interesting. So I am assuming a lot less heat over a longer period of time? Any youtube vids on the process that you know of? Would love to see it in action.

                  I bit the bullet and decided to make my own refractory. I live in a townhouse complex so no coal or open flame options for me so looking at the DIY refractories, they dont look that hard. Just trying to find the last lot of materials and I am good to go.

                  Also managed to get an old LPG cylinder which I am thinking of making a ball mill out of to totally avoid incineration. That a project that is going to take a long time and not a priority atm. I have seen twice now the cement mixer ball mill and they look good too.

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                  • #22
                    I'm thinking of getting a furnace and was wondering since it can get to 1150c would that be hot enough for ic chip pyrolysis to occur?
                    the chips would be dropped into a graphite crucible and brought up to temperature, what heat would be required for this? and how long could I expect to leave at temp'?
                    Buying eWaste link here

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                    • #23
                      Pyrolysis.

                      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrolysis

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                      • WEEE Ben
                        WEEE Ben commented
                        Editing a comment
                        ok, but will a furnace work to turn ic chips into dust?

                      • Geo
                        Geo commented
                        Editing a comment
                        It will incinerate chips. Pyrolysis and incineration is two completely different things. Incineration is heating something to the point it combust with the oxygen in the air. Pyrolysis is heating something to the point of combustion in the absence of oxygen. If you put the chips in a furnace, they will combust. Pyrolysis is completed in a sealed container with a controlled outlet. Usually a metal container like a metal bucket or small metal drum. A metal pipe is fastened into the lid so that the pipe is just short of the bottom. Your material is placed in the container with a small amount of water and the lid put in place with the pipe pointing up. The container is then turned bottom up and top down. Now the pipe is pointing down. It sits on a rack, in an oven or kiln and heated. Normally wood, coal or waste oil is used to heat the container. As the organics (plastic, rubber, resin) heat and begin "gassing off", the combustible gas is vented down into the fire. If you are using propane, natural gas, fuel oil, waste oil or any of the like, you can turn it down or off and the off gasses will fuel the heat needed. It will need to be turned back on near the end to keep the heat up so all the material has been baked all the way through. This also works with coated copper wire. If the process if followed and completed correctly, the wire is left to cool and then shaken and the coating falls off and the wire isn't even scorched.

                      • Bohdan
                        Bohdan commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Just don't do this with PVC coated wire.

                        The gasses produced can have long term health effects

                        just my $1 worth

                    • #24
                      ok, so i'll be incinerating then.

                      Here's the type of furnace i'm getting, although it's the better version, this one shown is a cheaper type
                      so I was thinking of just dropping ic chips into it and let them burn off
                       
                      Buying eWaste link here

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                      • Geo
                        Geo commented
                        Editing a comment
                        It will work but it will not hold many at a time. You may have better luck just putting them on a cookie sheet or loaf pan and putting them on a BBQ with charcoal. I have done it many times. In my opinion, you would be putting wear and tear on a good piece of equipment and there's no way you can get out of it what your putting into it as far as money. A few bucks for a bag of self lighting charcoal will do a few kg of chips at one time.

                      • WEEE Ben
                        WEEE Ben commented
                        Editing a comment
                        yeah you might be right, think i'll just keep accumulating ic chips until I move bush and have enough to make a difference, still got a few years to accumulate.

                      • Bohdan
                        Bohdan commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Just a side note

                        As Geo said "putting them on a cookie sheet or loaf pan" means a thin layer of chips.
                        As the resin is evaporated/expelled you are left with glass/silicone material which is a darn good heat shield; think ceramic tiles on space shuttle; and this stops the chips not directly being heated, not getting the full amount of heat and when you are incinerating you get pyrolysis in the inner most layer of chips and wind up with a hard cake of black carbon/silicone and not the nice white/gray ash you are looking for.

                        Ones first reaction is to break it up, which now mixes the ash with the carbonaceous mess and re-heat. I find that if you are careful, you can scrape off the top layer of ash to one side and then re-heat.

                        just my 1c worth
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