Melting Gold Foils

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  • #13
    Yeah when looking at video's melting gold they just drop it onto a clay dish and melt in minutes, so I couldn't work it out after so long of heating, my crucible obviously acted as a heat sink.

    Anyway I wanted to do a lot more things with metal, mostly melting my scratched up old silver coins and scrap gold jewelry, as well as making copper ingots from scrap wire, so I'll be getting a furnace.

    Here's my failed attempt
     
    Buying eWaste link here

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    • #14
      This is part of a guessing contest I sponsored on another forum. The contest was guess the weight of the foils and then guess the weight of the refined gold. The foils weighed 128.3g and the refined weight
      was 42.8g I am not the best refiner I know but I'm pretty sure the huge difference in weight lets us know that even the cleanest looking foils is not anywhere near pure gold.

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      • #15
        The prizes in the contest was the two small buttons shipped by me to the members that guessed the closest. I knew that the weights being so different, no one would be able to guess both the foil weight and refined weight and win both prizes.

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        • #16
          Little confused. So the total weight in pic 1 of the foils was 128.3 and the refined weight was 42.8. How was it refined? I would have thought that the result would have been a lot less if the 42.8 was 24k. I have about 5kg of fingers I have collected for a while, thinking its about time to refine.

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          • Geo
            Geo commented
            Editing a comment
            Refined with AR twice and dropped with SMB twice. Clean, close cut fingers yields about 4g per kg. So I would say you have twenty or so grams in your 5kg. The foils in the beaker did not come from fingers but military pins. They had a very thick nickel barrier layer. The AP (copper(II) chloride) is good at dissolving base metal but nickel doesn't oxidize easily. If I had boiled them in nitric acid, they would have been much closer to the refined weight.

        • #17
          Good info, thanks.

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          • #18
            Hi Ben

            Just wondering why you plan to melt your old silver coins? I have some as well but always told to keep as is as it is easier to sell them as junk silver coins than it is as an unmarked silver lump because of the need to assay.

            Curious as I want to know what to do with mine.

            Cheers


            Originally posted by WEEE Ben View Post
            Yeah when looking at video's melting gold they just drop it onto a clay dish and melt in minutes, so I couldn't work it out after so long of heating, my crucible obviously acted as a heat sink.

            Anyway I wanted to do a lot more things with metal, mostly melting my scratched up old silver coins and scrap gold jewelry, as well as making copper ingots from scrap wire, so I'll be getting a furnace.

            Here's my failed attempt

            Comment


            • #19
              Personal preference I guess, although junk silver is generally considered to be old currency like florins or round 50's which are only 90% or 80% silver, these I would leave as is.
              What I intend doing is melting the .999 silver coins that are either generic rounds that I don't like like zombucks, or coins that are too scratched up or have milk spots.
              these generally don't have any premium value, so they sell close to spot.

              A nice poured bar can sell for better then spot, depends on how it looks, but mostly for me it's just to keep the bars as my own hand made things, not really to sell.

              But assaying is easy these days because most dealers have them, a friend of mine who regularly melts silver from scrap has no problem selling them.
              Also you have silver stackers forum meets, every couple months there is a meet up in Melb' and othe states for stackers were they have little auctions and there's always a guy that rocks up with a hand held meter, spectrometer or something, so anyone who wants to can bring in things they want to get the purity of.

              so yeah, no issues at all really, only time I would be wary of poured bars is buying them on ebay, but there's a few guys on silver stackers that make bars, silver fox, humbolt etc
              their stuff sells for good money, especially the silver bars.
              Buying eWaste link here

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